Y-Blog

Posted: 25/02/2019 20:55:41 by Roger Christian
Topics: Assembly, Custom EOAT, Manufacturing, Supply Chain

Robot systems are most profitable for facilities that produce a high mix of pallet types at a high volume, or over multiple shifts. Systems can assemble about one pallet per minute (480 per shift). Fixed machinery still makes the most sense when producing high volumes of the same pallet type and size. The biggest ROI benefits come from the robotic system's ability to produce a variety of pallet types with minimal down time due to changeover. Read More

Posted: 11/02/2019 15:54:44 by Josh Leath
Topics: Arc Welding

Most likely, you’ve clicked on this blog because you’re thinking about robotics. Countless reports have shared the importance of automation implementation, but how can you embrace something (or spend capital dollars) when you don’t fully understand the concept? Well, as simple as ordering a half mushroom, half banana pepper pizza online, we’re here to help you figure out which pre-configured ArcWorld® robotic welding cells are best for your operation, swiping you right into the best fit possible. Read More

Posted: 28/01/2019 16:00:39 by Michael Castor
Topics: Handling, Machine Tending, Machine Vision

If you are in the machining business, the chances are pretty good that you’ve heard the adage, “if the machine isn’t running, you’re not making money.” While there is obviously more to keeping your business running, it’s true that your ability to make widgets for a customer relates directly to getting paid. Read More

Posted: 25/01/2019 16:11:12 by Jason Young
Topics: Arc Welding

The connection and interaction between an industrial robot, welding hardware and robot operator is made successful through a reliable and feature-rich weld interface. In recent years, industrial networking advancements have effectively shifted the market from using analog weld interfaces to digital weld interfaces. Read More

Posted: 27/11/2018 17:07:35 by Bob Graff
Topics: Education and Training

Next-generation robotics and manufacturing processes, inspired by Industry 4.0, are prompting the need for a higher level of readiness within the American workforce. Currently, two out of five Americans agree the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) worker shortage is severe1, influencing a shift toward a more dynamic approach to education to adequately fill 3.4 million manufacturing jobs by 2025—2 million of which may go unfilled due to talent unavailability2. So, what can be done to support the staffing needs of the future? Read More
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